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2016 W Mercury Dime Gold Pcgs Sp70 Centennial Coin First Strike 100th Ann Label

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2016 W Mercury Dime Gold Pcgs Sp70 Centennial Coin First Strike 100th Ann Label
2016 W Mercury Dime Gold Pcgs Sp70 Centennial Coin First Strike 100th Ann Label

2016 W Mercury Dime Gold Pcgs Sp70 Centennial Coin First Strike 100th Ann Label
PLEASE TAKE A MOMENT TO SEE MY STORE FOR A GREAT SELECTION ON MODERN GRADED GOLD AND SILVER! THIS LISTING IS FOR THE COIN AND LABEL LIKE SHOWN, MULTIPLES AVAILABLE SO SERIAL NUMBERS VARY. 2016 W MERCURY DIME GOLD PCGS SP70 FIRST STRIKE. The item “2016 W MERCURY DIME GOLD PCGS SP70 CENTENNIAL COIN FIRST STRIKE 100TH ANN LABEL” is in sale since Monday, July 25, 2016. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ US\Commemorative\Modern Gold (1984-Now)”. The seller is “jesse_james_rare_coins” and is located in Saint Paul, Minnesota. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, South africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Russian federation, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, Ukraine, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia.
  • Certification: PCGS
  • Grade: SP 70
  • Year: 2016
  • Denomination: dime (10 cents)
  • Strike Type: Satin
  • Mint Location: West Point
  • Composition: Gold
  • Circulated//Uncirculated: Uncirculated
  • Country//Region of Manufacture: United States
  • Certification Number: multiples available so serial numbers will vary

2016 W Mercury Dime Gold Pcgs Sp70 Centennial Coin First Strike 100th Ann Label

1799, Prussia, Frederick William III. Gold Friedrick d’Or Coin. RR! PCGS AU-58

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1799, Prussia, Frederick William III. Gold Friedrick d'Or Coin. RR! PCGS AU-58
1799, Prussia, Frederick William III. Gold Friedrick d'Or Coin. RR! PCGS AU-58

1799, Prussia, Frederick William III. Gold Friedrick d'Or Coin. RR! PCGS AU-58
1799, Prussia, Frederick William III. Gold Friedrick d’Or Coin. Mint Year: 1799 Mint Place: Berlin (A) Reference: Friedberg 2422, Oldenburg 208, KM-371. Certified and graded by PCGS as AU-58! Denomination: Frederick d’Or (Friedrichs d’or = Gold Frederick) Material: Gold. 903 Weight: 6.7gm. Obverse: Uniformed bust of Frederick William III left. WILHELM III KOENIG VON PREUSSEN. Reverse: Crowned eagle of Prussia perched on war trophies (wreathed helmet, shield, sword & fasces). Date (17-99) split by mint initial (A) below. Legend: 17 (A) 99. Frederick William III German. (3 August 1770 7 June 1840) was king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840. He ruled Prussia during the difficult times of the Napoleonic Wars and the end of the Holy Roman Empire. Steering a careful course between France and her enemies, after a major military defeat in 1806, he eventually and reluctantly joined the coalition against Napoleon in the. Following Napoleon’s defeat he was King of Prussia during the Congress of Vienna which assembled to settle the political questions arising from the new, post-Napoleonic order in Europe. He was determined to unify the Protestant churches, to homogenize their liturgy, their organization and even their architecture. The long-term goal was to have fully centralized royal control of all the Protestant churches in the Prussian Union of churches. Frederick William was born in Potsdam in 1770 as the son of Frederick William II of Prussia and Frederika Louisa of Hesse-Darmstadt. He was considered to be a shy and reserved boy, which became noticeable in his particularly reticent conversations distinguished by the lack of personal pronouns. This manner of speech subsequently came to be considered entirely appropriate for military officers. As a child, Frederick William’s father (under the influence of his mistress, Wilhelmine Enke, Countess of Lichtenau) had him handed over to tutors, as was quite normal for the period. He spent part of the time living at Paretz, the estate of the old soldier Count Hans von Blumenthal who was the governor of his brother Prince Heinrich. They thus grew up partly with the Count’s son, who accompanied them on their Grand Tour in the 1780s. Frederick William was happy at Paretz, and for this reason in 1795 he bought it from his boyhood friend and turned it into an important royal country retreat. He was a melancholy boy, but he grew up pious and honest. His tutors included the dramatist Johann Engel. As a soldier he received the usual training of a Prussian prince, obtained his lieutenancy in 1784, became a colonel in 1790, and took part in the campaigns against France of 17921794. On 24 December 1793, Frederick William married Luise of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, who bore him ten children. (Crown Prince’s Palace) in Berlin, Frederick William lived a civil life with a problem-free marriage, which did not change even when he became King of Prussia in 1797. His wife Luise was particularly loved by the Prussian people, which boosted the popularity of the whole House of Hohenzollern, including the King himself. Frederick William succeeded to the throne on 16 November 1797. He also became, in personal union, the sovereign prince of the Principality of Neuchâtel (17971806 and again 18131840). At once, the new King showed that he was earnest of his good intentions by cutting down the expenses of the royal establishment, dismissing his father’s ministers, and reforming the most oppressive abuses of the late reign. He had the Hohenzollern determination to retain personal power but not the Hohenzollern genius for using it. Too distrustful to delegate responsibility to his ministers, he lacked the will to strike out and follow a consistent course for himself. Disgusted with the moral debauchery of his father’s court (in both political intrigues and sexual affairs), Frederick William’s first endeavor was to restore morality to his dynasty. The eagerness to restore dignity to his family went so far that it nearly caused sculptor Johann Gottfried Schadow to cancel his. Project, which was commissioned by the previous monarch Frederick William II. He was quoted as saying the following, which demonstrated his sense of duty and peculiar manner of speech. Every civil servant has a dual obligation: to the sovereign and to the country. It can occur that the two are not compatible; then, the duty to the country is higher. At first Frederick William and his advisors attempted to pursue a policy of neutrality in the Napoleonic Wars. Although they succeeded in keeping out of the Third Coalition in 1805, eventually Frederick William was swayed by the belligerent attitude of the queen, who led Prussia’s pro-war party, and entered into war in October 1806. On 14 October 1806, at the Battle of Jena-Auerstädt, the French defeated the Prussian army led by Frederick William, and the Prussian army collapsed. The royal family fled to Memel, East Prussia, where they fell on the mercy of Emperor Alexander I of Russia. Alexander, too, suffered defeat at the hands of the French, and at Tilsit on the Niemen France made peace with Russia and Prussia. Napoleon dealt with Prussia very harshly, despite the pregnant Queen’s personal interview with the French emperor. Prussia lost many of its Polish territories, as well as all territory west of the Elbe, and had to finance a large indemnity and to pay for French troops to occupy key strong points within the Kingdom. Although the ineffectual King himself seemed resigned to Prussia’s fate, various reforming ministers, such as Baron vom Stein, Prince von Hardenberg, Scharnhorst, and Count Gneisenau, set about reforming Prussia’s administration and military, with the encouragement of Queen Luise (who died, greatly mourned, in 1810). In 1813, following Napoleon’s defeat in Russia, Frederick William turned against France and signed an alliance with Russia at Kalisz, although he had to flee Berlin, still under French occupation. Prussian troops played a key part in the victories of the allies in 1813 and 1814, and the King himself travelled with the main army of Prince Schwarzenberg, along with Alexander of Russia and Francis of Austria. At the Congress of Vienna, Frederick William’s ministers succeeded in securing important territorial increases for Prussia, although they failed to obtain the annexation of all of Saxony, as they had wished. Following the war, Frederick William turned towards political reaction, abandoning the promises he had made in 1813 to provide Prussia with a constitution. Frederick William was determined to unify the Protestant churches, to homogenize their liturgy, their organization and even their architecture. In a series of proclamations over several years the. Church of the Prussian Union. Was formed, bringing together the majority group of Lutherans, and the minority group of Reformed Protestants. The main effect was that the government of Prussia had full control over church affairs, with the king himself recognized as the leading bishop. In 1824 Frederick William III remarried (morganatically) Countess Auguste von Harrach, Princess of Liegnitz. They had no children. He died on 7 June 1840 in Berlin, survived by his second wife. His eldest son, Frederick William IV, succeeded him. Frederick William III is buried at the Mausoleum in Schlosspark Charlottenburg, Berlin. The item “1799, Prussia, Frederick William III. Gold Friedrick d’Or Coin. RR! PCGS AU-58″ is in sale since Sunday, February 19, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ World\Gold”. The seller is “coinworldtv” and is located in Europe. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Certification: PCGS
  • Certification Number: 81492712
  • Grade: AU58

1799, Prussia, Frederick William III. Gold Friedrick d'Or Coin. RR! PCGS AU-58

1382, Doges of Venice, Antonio Venier. Gold Zecchino Ducat Coin. R! PCGS MS-62

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1382, Doges of Venice, Antonio Venier. Gold Zecchino Ducat Coin. R! PCGS MS-62
1382, Doges of Venice, Antonio Venier. Gold Zecchino Ducat Coin. R! PCGS MS-62

1382, Doges of Venice, Antonio Venier. Gold Zecchino Ducat Coin. R! PCGS MS-62
1382, Doges of Venice, Antonio Venier. Gold Zecchino Ducat Coin. Certified and graded by PCGS as MS-62! Diameter: 20mm Material: Gold! Mark standing right, presenting cross topped banner to kneeling Doge. Pellet (privy mark) below St. Legend: ANTOVENERIOSMVENETI / DVX Reverse: Christ standing facing, raising hand in benediction and holding Gospels. Halo of light (mandorla) with 9 stars around! Legend: SITTXPEDAT QTVREGISISTE DVCAT. 1330 23 November 1400 was a Doge of Venice reigning from October 1382 to his death. He was interred in the Basilica di San Giovanni e Paolo, a traditional burial place of the doges. He was married to Agnese. The item “1382, Doges of Venice, Antonio Venier. Gold Zecchino Ducat Coin. R! PCGS MS-62″ is in sale since Tuesday, February 21, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ World\Gold”. The seller is “coinworldtv” and is located in Europe. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Certification: PCGS
  • Certification Number: 82608279
  • Grade: MS62
  • Composition: Gold

1382, Doges of Venice, Antonio Venier. Gold Zecchino Ducat Coin. R! PCGS MS-62

1883, Vietnam (Annam), Emperor Tu Duc. Unique Gold 1 Tien Coin. PCGS AU-55

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1883, Vietnam (Annam), Emperor Tu Duc. Unique Gold 1 Tien Coin. PCGS AU-55
1883, Vietnam (Annam), Emperor Tu Duc. Unique Gold 1 Tien Coin. PCGS AU-55
1883, Vietnam (Annam), Emperor Tu Duc. Unique Gold 1 Tien Coin. PCGS AU-55
1883, Vietnam (Annam), Emperor Tu Duc. Unique Gold 1 Tien Coin. PCGS AU-55

1883, Vietnam (Annam), Emperor Tu Duc. Unique Gold 1 Tien Coin. PCGS AU-55
1883, Vietnam (Annam), Emperor Tu Duc. Unique Gold 1 Tien Coin. Certified and graded by PCGS as AU-55 only this single specimen certified! Obverse: Sceptre an swastika. Traces of overstriking (four characters around sun) of the reverse underneath! Reverse: Four characters around sun with blunts. Tu – Duc – Thong – Bao. For your consideration an exceedingly rare certified gold coin, struck during the reign of Emperor Tu Duc, who was reigning from 1848 ot 1883. The offered specimen appears uniquely double-struck, with a high rim, but is still a problem-free coin and extremely rare for this period and type of coins. A very rare and important addition, being one of the toughest to find gold coin types of asia! A Chinese general set up the Kingdom of Nam-Viet on the Red River. This kingdom was overthrown by the Chinese under the Han Dynasty in 111 B. Whereupon the country became a Chinese province under the name of Giao-Chi, which was later changed to Annam which means peaceful or pacified south. Chinese rule was maintained until 968, when the Vietnamese became independent until 1407 when China again invaded Viet Nam. The Chinese were driven out in 1428 and the country became independent and named Dai-Viet. After the French conquered Dai Nam, they split the country into three parts: The South became the Colony of Cochinchina, the North became the Protectorate of Tonkin and the central became the Protectorate of Annam. The emperors were permitted to produce small quantities of coins, presentation pieces, and bullion bars. The smaller gold pieces saw a limited circulation, mainly among the local merchants and foreign traders. Emperor T c (22 September 1829 17 July 1883) (full name: Nguyn Phúc Hng Nhm , also Nguyn Phúc Thì) was the fourth emperor of the Nguyn Dynasty of Vietnam and reigned from 18471883. The son of Emperor Thiu Tr, Prince Nguyn Phúc Hng Nhm was born on 22 September 1829, and succeeded his father on the throne, with the reigning title of T c , but family troubles caused his era to have a violent start. Thiu Tr had passed over his more moderate eldest son, Hng Bo, to give the throne to T c, known for his staunch Confucianism and opposition to foreigners and innovation. As a result, and due to the repressive policies of the previous Nguyn Dynasty emperor, there was now a great deal of dissatisfaction with Nguyn rule and a legitimate royal figure to rally this opposition. Prince Nguyn Phúc Hng Bo became the leader of a rebellion against T c, consisting of Confucian scholars who were angered that the family hierarchy had been dishonored (by passing over the eldest son) some remaining supporters of the Lê Dynasty (who many still considered the legitimate dynasty of Vietnam) as well as the usual peasants angry over Nguyn taxation and the usual corrupt mandarins as well as the Roman Catholic missionaries and Christian converts who had been so persecuted by Minh Mng and Thiu Tr. With swift military force, T c suppressed the rebellion and was set to execute his brother, but was dissuaded by his mother, Dowager queen T D, and Hng Bo killed himself in prison. Emperor T c continued the policies of his predecessors, shutting Vietnam off from the outside world and refusing all efforts to modernize the country. Accounts of his personal life show a gentle and educated man, but his policies brought on conflict with Europe that Vietnam could not win. He oppressed all foreigners in Vietnam, especially the Christian community, who had frequently tried to overthrow his ancestors, such as in the Lê Vn Khôi revolt, calling their religion a “perverse doctrine”. The Christian mandarin Nguyn Trng T tried to convince T c that this was a suicidal policy, but he did not listen, confident that France was too involved with the chaos in Europe in 1848 to respond, but he was mistaken. France responded with a large military expeditionary force and attacked up from southern Vietnam. The Nguyn army fought bravely for some time, but their antiquated weapons and tactics were no match for the French, who suffered more from the climate and disease than from enemy resistance. With French forces moving closer against him, T c called upon his Manchu over-lord, the Qing Emperor, for help and so ensued the Sino-French War. The fighting around Hanoi against China and the Black Flag pirates ended with France victorious and China gave up their position as feudal master of Vietnam and recognized France as the ruling power over the region. To make matters worse, Emperor T c had to deal with renewed internal rebellions which had become commonplace for the Nguyn Dynasty. There were literally hundreds of small rebellions and uprisings against Nguyn rule. Ineffective attempts to enforce the ban on Christian missionaries were also the biggest source of trouble, including the execution of a Spanish bishop which was used to justify the French and Spanish invasion that led to the fall of Saigon. By an order of 1848 T c commanded all Vietnamese Catholic converts to renounce their religion, otherwise they would be branded on the face with the mark of a heretic and surrender all of their rights and privileges. This rallied most of the European powers against Vietnam, and T c by doing this had given up any hope of Vietnam gaining help as a victim from the outside world. When further rebellions broke out as the French were advancing on the capital, T c feared that his authority was crumbling. He preferred to make a deal with the French so that he could crush the rebellion since while France may demand humiliating concessions, the rebels would most likely depose and/or kill him. He signed away the southernmost of Vietnam, Cochinchina, to be a French colony and accepted the status of a French protectorate for his country. This caused a huge uproar, and many, such as the famous mandarin Trng nh, refused to recognize the treaty and fought on in defense of their country, denouncing T c for surrendering any part of their homeland. Emperor T c did not live to see the worst effects of colonialism on his country, but he is often regarded as the last Emperor of Vietnam, since he was the last to rule independently. A case of smallpox left him impotent so he had no children despite a huge harem of wives he kept in his palace. According to legend, he died in 1883, cursing the French with his dying breath. After his death his adopted son Dc c was deposed by court officials after a reign of three days. The item “1883, Vietnam (Annam), Emperor Tu Duc. Unique Gold 1 Tien Coin. PCGS AU-55″ is in sale since Thursday, March 23, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ World\Gold”. The seller is “coinworldtv” and is located in Europe. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Certification: PCGS
  • Certification Number: 81492711
  • Grade: AU55
  • Composition: Gold

1883, Vietnam (Annam), Emperor Tu Duc. Unique Gold 1 Tien Coin. PCGS AU-55

1879 Flowing Hair $4 Stella Gold Coin PCGS PR Genuine UNC Details Rare JV593

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1879 Flowing Hair $4 Stella Gold Coin PCGS PR Genuine UNC Details Rare JV593
1879 Flowing Hair $4 Stella Gold Coin PCGS PR Genuine UNC Details Rare JV593
1879 Flowing Hair $4 Stella Gold Coin PCGS PR Genuine UNC Details Rare JV593
1879 Flowing Hair $4 Stella Gold Coin PCGS PR Genuine UNC Details Rare JV593

1879 Flowing Hair $4 Stella Gold Coin PCGS PR Genuine UNC Details Rare JV593
This listing is for. PR Genuine UNC Details Rare Coin. As displayed in the photos. We can no longer do business with Minnesota non-dealer residents. The item “1879 Flowing Hair $4 Stella Gold Coin PCGS PR Genuine UNC Details Rare JV593″ is in sale since Wednesday, January 18, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ US\Gold (Pre-1933)\$3 & $4″. The seller is “kedziekoins” and is located in Chicago, Illinois. This item can be shipped to United States.
  • Certification: PCGS
  • Grade: PR Genuine UNC Details
  • Year: 1879
  • Certification Number: 29106543
  • Composition: Gold
  • Coin: Flowing Hair
  • Denomination: $4

1879 Flowing Hair $4 Stella Gold Coin PCGS PR Genuine UNC Details Rare JV593

2016-W Gold Centennial 3-Coin Set PCGS SP70. While supply lasts. NEW PRICE

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2016-W Gold Centennial 3-Coin Set PCGS SP70. While supply lasts. NEW PRICE
2016-W Gold Centennial 3-Coin Set PCGS SP70. While supply lasts. NEW PRICE

2016-W Gold Centennial 3-Coin Set PCGS SP70. While supply lasts. NEW PRICE
We are offering the 3-Coin Centennial Gold Set. The unique PCGS 3-Coin Holder is a great way to store your Centennial Gold Set. If You Like To Read Fine Print. The actual item you will receive is guaranteed to be as described. The Coin Monkeys are lifelong of the PNG and ANA members. Authorized dealers of PCGS, NGC and CAC. The item “2016-W Gold Centennial 3-Coin Set PCGS SP70. While supply lasts. NEW PRICE” is in sale since Wednesday, July 05, 2017. This item is in the category “Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ US\Commemorative\Modern Gold (1984-Now)”. The seller is “yourcoinmonkeys” and is located in Beverly Hills, California. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, South africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, Ukraine, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Brazil, Colombia.
  • Certification: PCGS
  • Grade: SP70
  • Year: 2016
  • Mint Location: West Point
  • Strike Type: Business
  • Composition: Gold
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States
  • Fineness: .9999
  • Circulated/Uncirculated: Uncirculated
  • Certification Number: Varies
  • Denomination: Dime, Quarter and Half Dollar

2016-W Gold Centennial 3-Coin Set PCGS SP70. While supply lasts. NEW PRICE